Kategorie: Kulturwissenschaft

Projektdetails

Hochschule
Pädagogische Hochschule Oberösterreich
Sprache
Projektleitung gesamt
Keppelmueller, Joachim; Mag. Dr. BEd OStR Prof.
Projektleitung intern
Interne Projektmitarbeiter/innen
Reinhart, Ulrike; Mag. Dr. OStR Prof.
Externe Projektmitarbeiter/innen
Kooperationspartner
Laufzeit
2016 – 2018
Beschreibung
In den letzten Jahren nimmt aus der subjektiven Wahrnehmung des Antragstellers die Zahl der sichtbar tätowierten und/oder gepiercten Studierenden stetig zu. Auffallende Gesichtspiercings und auch großflächige Tattoos sind – so die subjektive Wahrnehmung – keine Seltenheit.
Die im Studienalltag sichtbaren Piercings befinden sich im Gesicht – meist bei den Augenbrauen, der Nase oder Lippen – sowie an den Ohren.
Die Wahl der Tattoo-Motive reicht von bunten, fröhlich anmutenden Motiven bis zu monochromen Vanitassymbolen.

Im Gegensatz zu verschiedenen anderen Berufszweigen gibt es für Lehrerinnen und Lehrer keine all-gemeingültigen Bekleidungsvorschriften. Kleidung und Körperschmuck gelten als Teil des individuellen Ausdrucks und fällt somit unter den Schutz der persönlichen Freiheit. (vgl. Schulblatt des Kantons Zürich 1/2009, S.6)
Die beantragte Studie ist als Teilbereich eines geplanten Forschungsclusters zum Thema Leh-rer/innenpersönlichkeit und –identität gedacht.

Ziele des gegenständlichen Antrags:
• die tatsächlich eingetretenen Wirkungen des sichtbaren Körperschmucks im Unterricht, bei im Berufsleben stehenden Lehrerinnen und Lehrern zu erheben,
• den weiteren geplanten Umgang mit dem vorhandenen Körperschmuck vor dem Hinter-grund der persönlichen Erfahrungen im Berufsleben zu erheben.

Methode
• Interviews in der Explorationsphase (10 Leitfadeninterviews)
• Fragebogen für Lehrerinnen und Lehrer (online)

Beschreibung (engl.)
URL
Bericht

Projektdetails

Hochschule
Pädagogische Hochschule Oberösterreich
Sprache
Projektleitung gesamt
Kennedy, Melissa Jane; Dr. BA. MA.
Projektleitung intern
Kennedy, Melissa Jane; Dr. BA. MA. Prof.
Interne Projektmitarbeiter/innen
Spann, Harald; Mag. DDr. Prof.
Externe Projektmitarbeiter/innen
Born-Lechleitner, Ilse;
Kooperationspartner
Johannes Kepler Universität Linz
Universität Wien
Laufzeit
2018 – 2022
Beschreibung
1. Ausgangslage
„Storying Our World“ claims that a society‘s stories shape reality. With the 2008 Financial Crisis, the developed world narrative of the supremacy of neoliberalism was challenged. In the ten years from 2008—2018 an outpouring of texts by both economists and producers of written and visual media, particularly in the USA and UK, debunk global capitalism as unfair, unethical, and unsustainable. Instead of the primacy of market and finance, they argue for “human economics”: the understanding of the economy as principally concerned with the well-being and sustainability of family, community, and the environment. All these texts employ narrative forms to convey their economic stories, including economic metaphors and images, parables and fables, and in extended dramatic plotlines and case studies. “Storying Our World” thus analyses what literary and media narratives tell us about the choices, priorities, and desires of the „human economy“. Preliminary research (presented at 3 conferences in 2017-18) has already identified several recurring categories around key foci: 1) A desire for community collaboration over individualistic competition; 2) The aim of well-being over financial wealth; 3) Th need for sustainable rather than extractive relationsip with the environment; 4) to promote generosity rather than greed; 5) the change to a circular economy rather than eternal growth; 6) a desire to work-to-live not live-to-work.
The pedagogical aspect is the student-led, hands-on experience in creating the corpus, responding to the narratives, and using these texts in the EFL classroom. The corpus and its analysis derives from student-led analysis and research in English Literature and Cultural Studies Modules in PS and SE courses. This work further provides the initial participatory Action Research for developing the ABC-method as basis for the English Literature and Cultural Studies Curriculum.
The Research Outcomes of the project’s findings are conference presentations, invited lectures, publication of academic articles and a single-authored monograph. Following the initial Action Research into the ABC Method with participation from the Project Team (Spann, Born-Lechleitner), Discet3 partners (Spann, Thomas Wagner, Erwin Gierlinger), and students, I anticipate developing a parallel research project on the ABC Method.

2. Zielsetzungen
a. To identify in New Economic Criticism the common categories of human economics
b. To establish a corpus of narratives that respond to these categories in a range of media forms (pop-economics books, fiction, film, TV series, computer games, other)
c. To investigate the main components of literary form and content in these narratives
d. To study reader responses to these stories through student-led research (EB14.1 (literature) and EB14.3 (culture) Seminars and BA Theses)
e. To consider the pedagogical potential of these stories in EFL literature in the classroom through student-led research (EB14.1Literature and EB14.3Culture) Seminar in English Studies and BA Theses)
f. Groundwork for a potential project extension to study the application of these stories in the classroom through long-term contact with the students after graduation
g. Groundwork for a potential parallel project of the ABC Methodology

3. Methode
a. Extensive reading to define the common categories of human economics in current economic criticism and the narratives used to describe them
b. With students in PS and SE, establish and analyse a corpus of narratives that respond to these categories in a range of media forms
c. Narratological literary analysis of language, form and content of the corpus (ABC Method ‚A‘)
d. Reader Response Theory applied to student responses to these texts (ABC Method ‚B‘)
e. Creativity-based exercises with a didactic interest in teaching these texts in the EFL classroom (ABC Method ‚C‘)

Beschreibung (engl.)
URL
Bericht

Projektdetails

Hochschule
Private Pädagogische Hochschule Linz
Sprache
Projektleitung gesamt
Wiesinger, Markus; Dr
Projektleitung intern
Wiesinger, Markus; Mag. Dr.
Interne Projektmitarbeiter/innen
Bauer, Marlene; MEd. BEd
Kreutner, Edith; Mag. Dr.
Schöftner, Thomas; Dr. BEd MSc.
Externe Projektmitarbeiter/innen
Hardy, Phil;
Lightfoot, Zoe;
Lynch, Michael;
Kooperationspartner
Laufzeit
2020 –
Beschreibung
This project involves mutual international teaching placements, which PHDL have been organising and running with our partners and affiliated schools in the UK (York/Edinburgh) and Austria (Linz/Bad Goisern) since 2007. Basically, it is an immersion programme for primary and secondary trainees alike and was designed to benefit their professional development, not only in terms of their teaching capacity, but also as regards their second language proficiency and cross-cultural awareness. In order to place the project on a solid academic footing, a questionnaire has been designed to both evaluate the benefits of these mutual teaching placements and to see how well immersed the trainees have been in the target culture. The research design seeks to cover a wide spectrum of intercultural, linguistic and didactic issues revolving around 5 selected aspects warranting further research, notably language proficiency, cultural studies, didactics and methodology, school systems and efficiency of organisation. The contents of the questionnaire are based on the relevant literature, state-of-the-art didactics and methodology and recent L1/L2 acquisition theories (Brown and Larson-Hall, 2014. Cook and Singleton, 2014. Legutke et al., 2012. Lightbown and Spada, 2013. Mackey, 2012. Thomas, 2001. Wiesinger, 2016). Strictly speaking, there are two questionnaires – one aimed at UK trainees, the incoming students, and the other targeting Austrian trainees. The respective questionnaires, predominantly based on multiple-choice questions, are available on the PHDL Moodle platform and any student participating in the project is required to complete the questionnaire twice – before and after their stint abroad. In the meantime, quite a number of students have joined this research project, actively analysing the data for their own bachelor’s and master’s theses – with their very own scope of research, of course – thus not only benefitting their own academic careers but also contributing to the project as a whole. For example, some very recent and intriguing findings have been that a) Austrian teachers primarily rely on their coursebooks while UK teachers very often do without them (Schauer, 2017). b) the ‘grammar-translation method’, as a teaching style, is still firmly entrenched and extremely popular with SL teachers across the board (Daborer, 2018. Grabner, 2019). c) Austrian EFL teachers who appear to be following a ‘communicative style of teaching’ do so ‘unknowingly’. On the contrary, these interactive ideas and activities are suggested by the teachers’ respective coursebooks and not by the teachers’ own design, as their constant interruption of their learners’ flow of speech for the sake of a mistake is very reminiscent of the ‘grammar-translation method’ and incompatible with communicative SL approaches (Daborer, 2018. Grabner, 2019). d) students of a foreign language, e.g. German or English, seem to be fairly proficient in the standard – usually, academic – variety of the language, but, apparently, have serious shortcomings in less formal registers and styles of the target language (Pilsner, 2019) e) immersion projects of this kind increase the SL learners’ cross-cultural awareness and lead to a deeper understanding of colloquialisms, regionalisms and idiomatic expressions, thus expanding the learners’ repertoire of more informal styles and registers as a whole (Alkühn, 2018). A battery of tests has so far been performed based on inferential statistics to ascertain the test design’s reliability and the validity of the data (t-Test, Gaussian distribution, normality test, parameter analyses), which show there is a significant difference between the trainees’ feedback before and after their stints. It can thus be presumed that these placements do indeed benefit the participating students considerably (Schöftner, 2017).
Beschreibung (engl.)
This project involves mutual international teaching placements, which PHDL have been organising and running with our partners and affiliated schools in the UK (York/Edinburgh) and Austria (Linz/Bad Goisern) since 2007. Basically, it is an immersion programme for primary and secondary trainees alike and was designed to benefit their professional development, not only in terms of their teaching capacity, but also as regards their second language proficiency and cross-cultural awareness. In order to place the project on a solid academic footing, a questionnaire has been designed to both evaluate the benefits of these mutual teaching placements and to see how well immersed the trainees have been in the target culture. The research design seeks to cover a wide spectrum of intercultural, linguistic and didactic issues revolving around 5 selected aspects warranting further research, notably language proficiency, cultural studies, didactics and methodology, school systems and efficiency of organisation. The contents of the questionnaire are based on the relevant literature, state-of-the-art didactics and methodology and recent L1/L2 acquisition theories (Brown and Larson-Hall, 2014. Cook and Singleton, 2014. Legutke et al., 2012. Lightbown and Spada, 2013. Mackey, 2012. Thomas, 2001. Wiesinger, 2016). Strictly speaking, there are two questionnaires – one aimed at UK trainees, the incoming students, and the other targeting Austrian trainees. The respective questionnaires, predominantly based on multiple-choice questions, are available on the PHDL Moodle platform and any student participating in the project is required to complete the questionnaire twice – before and after their stint abroad. In the meantime, quite a number of students have joined this research project, actively analysing the data for their own bachelor’s and master’s theses – with their very own scope of research, of course – thus not only benefitting their own academic careers but also contributing to the project as a whole. For example, some very recent and intriguing findings have been that a) Austrian teachers primarily rely on their coursebooks while UK teachers very often do without them (Schauer, 2017). b) the ‘grammar-translation method’, as a teaching style, is still firmly entrenched and extremely popular with SL teachers across the board (Daborer, 2018. Grabner, 2019). c) Austrian EFL teachers who appear to be following a ‘communicative style of teaching’ do so ‘unknowingly’. On the contrary, these interactive ideas and activities are suggested by the teachers’ respective coursebooks and not by the teachers’ own design, as their constant interruption of their learners’ flow of speech for the sake of a mistake is very reminiscent of the ‘grammar-translation method’ and incompatible with communicative SL approaches (Daborer, 2018. Grabner, 2019). d) students of a foreign language, e.g. German or English, seem to be fairly proficient in the standard – usually, academic – variety of the language, but, apparently, have serious shortcomings in less formal registers and styles of the target language (Pilsner, 2019) e) immersion projects of this kind increase the SL learners’ cross-cultural awareness and lead to a deeper understanding of colloquialisms, regionalisms and idiomatic expressions, thus expanding the learners’ repertoire of more informal styles and registers as a whole (Alkühn, 2018). A battery of tests has so far been performed based on inferential statistics to ascertain the test design’s reliability and the validity of the data (t-Test, Gaussian distribution, normality test, parameter analyses), which show there is a significant difference between the trainees’ feedback before and after their stints. It can thus be presumed that these placements do indeed benefit the participating students considerably (Schöftner, 2017).
URL
Bericht

Projektdetails

Hochschule
Private Pädagogische Hochschule Wien/Krems
Sprache
Projektleitung gesamt
Zelger, Sabine; Mag. Dr.
Projektleitung intern
Zelger, Sabine; Mag. Dr.
Interne Projektmitarbeiter/innen
Externe Projektmitarbeiter/innen
Hebenstreit, Desiree;
Kooperationspartner
Laufzeit
2019 – 2022
Beschreibung
Vor dem Hintergrund literatur- und kulturwissenschaftlicher Entwicklungen zielt das Projekt auf eine inhaltliche und methodische Erweiterung der Curricula des Faches Deutsche Philologie an den Univer-sitäten Wien, Bratislava und Szeged ab. Für die Förderung von Medien- und praxisorientierten philolo-gischen Kompetenzen werden über nationale-kulturelle Grenzen hinweg Materialien aufgearbeitet, in denen Brüche und Krisenbewältigungen der Jahre 1848, 1867, 1873, 1918/19, 1945 im Zentrum ste-hen. Dabei wird Kultur im Sinne der Kulturtransferforschung als offener konstruktiver Prozess aufge-fasst.
In den Entwicklungsprozess, der von einem Fachbeirat begleitet und evaluiert wird, sind auch Studie-rende der drei Universitäten involviert. Die themenspezifischen Materialien werden zudem in Multi-plikatorInnenveranstaltungen, unter anderem an der KPH Wien/Krems, präsentiert. Sie können von Lehrenden in fachdidaktischen Lehrveranstaltungen an der KPH Wien/Krems sowie weiteren Hochschulen im Verbund Nord/Ost genutzt und mit den Studierenden weiterbearbeitet werden. Dabei werden eigene didaktisierte Module entstehen, die den Einsatz der Materialien an Schulen ermöglichen. Diese neuen Module können auch nach Projektende auf die digitale Plattform ge-stellt werden, da die Betreuung der Plattform über das Projektende hinaus gesichert ist.
Beschreibung (engl.)
URL
Bericht